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ATTENTION SHAW KIDS!
SHAW ISLAND LIBRARY
END OF SUMMER READING PARTY
AT THE SOUTH BEACH COOK SHED
WED. SEPTEMBER 2, 1 TO 3PM

GAMES! CRAFTS! TREATS!
PLUS A READING OF BUNI'S SHAW SCHOOL FALL PLAY
“THE LEGEND OF THE ICE FOLK”

QUESTIONS? CALL JODY (3715) OR BUNI (317 5706)
Children's Story Corner at the Library


Past Event:

SATURDAY AUGUST 22  10AM TO 11AM

AT THE LIBRARY - PIRATES PRINCESSES KNIGHTS DRAGONS - STORY PLAYS COME ALIVE

THE CASTLE BUILDER, BY DENNIS NOLAN, ADAPTED BY BUNI LYNCH, For Ages up to 8 years

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(Photo by Shirley Lange)

Come by and visit

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​New Book Arrivals for Children and Young Adults (April 2014):

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Ninja Detective by Octavia Spencer: Deer Creek is a small town whose only hope for survival is the success of their Founder's Day Festival. But the festival's main attraction, a time capsule that many people believe hold the town's treasure, has gone missing. Randi Rhodes and her best friend, D.C., are Bruce Lee–inspired ninjas and local detectives determined to solve the case. Even if it means investigating in a haunted cabin and facing mean old Angus McCarthy, prime suspect. They have three days to find the treasure…the future of their whole town is at stake! Will these kids be able to save the day?

Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage: Rising sixth grader Miss Moses LoBeau lives in the small town of Tupelo Landing, NC, where everyone's business is fair game and no secret is sacred. She washed ashore in a hurricane eleven years ago, and she's been making waves ever since. Although Mo hopes someday to find her "upstream mother," she's found a home with the Colonel--a café owner with a forgotten past of his own--and Miss Lana, the fabulous café hostess. She will protect those she loves with every bit of her strong will and tough attitude. So when a lawman comes to town asking about a murder, Mo and her best friend, Dale Earnhardt Johnson III, set out to uncover the truth in hopes of saving the only family Mo has ever known.

Leisl & Po by Lauren Oliver: Liesl lives in a tiny attic bedroom, locked away by her cruel stepmother. Her only friends are the shadows and the mice—until one night a ghost named Po appears from the darkness. That same evening, an alchemist's apprentice named Will makes an innocent mistake that has tremendous consequences for Liesl and Po, and it draws the three of them together on an extraordinary journey.

The Chaos of Stars by Kiersten White: Isadora's family is seriously screwed up—which comes with the territory when you're the human daughter of the Egyptian gods Isis and Osiris. Isadora is tired of her immortal relatives and their ancient mythological drama, so when she gets the chance to move to California with her brother, she jumps on it. But her new life comes with plenty of its own dramatic—and dangerous—complications . . . and Isadora quickly learns there's no such thing as a clean break from family.

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In New York by Marc Brown:  Marc Brown now calls New York City home, and with In New York, he shares his love for all that the city has to offer and all that it stands for, including the way it's always changing and evolving. From its earliest days as New Amsterdam to the contemporary wonders of Central Park, the Statue of Liberty, and the Empire State Building, to the kid-appealing subway, High Line, and so much more, Marc's rollicking text and gorgeous illustrations showcase what he's come to adore about New York after fulfilling his life-long dream to live in the city he fell in love with during a childhood visit. 

Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky's Abstract Art by Barb Rosenstock:  Vasya Kandinsky was a proper little boy: he studied math and history, he practiced the piano, he sat up straight and was perfectly polite. And when his family sent him to art classes, they expected him to paint pretty houses and flowers—like a proper artist. But as Vasya opened his paint box and began mixing the reds, the yellows, the blues, he heard a strange sound—the swirling colors trilled like an orchestra tuning up for a symphony! And as he grew older, he continued to hear brilliant colors singing and see vibrant sounds dancing. But was Vasya brave enough to put aside his proper still lifes and portraits and paint . . . music?
 
In this exuberant celebration of creativity, Barb Rosenstock and Mary GrandPré tell the fascinating story of Vasily Kandinsky, one of the very first painters of abstract art. Throughout his life, Kandinsky experienced colors as sounds, and sounds as colors—and bold, groundbreaking works burst forth from his noisy paint box.

Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch by Anne Isaacs:  When Widow Tulip Jones of Bore, England, inherits a ranch in By-Golly Gully, Texas, and moves in with two trunks of tea, twelve pet tortoises, and three servants, hilarity ensues. The peaceful life suits the wealthy widow fine until word gets out and every unmarried man in Texas lines up to marry her. Widow Tulip and her small staff of three can't possibly run the farm and manage all the suitors, so she devises a plan—and it just might work. This story filled with giant tortoises, 1,000 brides, bad guys, a smart widow, and even a little romance is sure to get kids laughing.

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Paul Meets Bernadette by Rosy Lamb:  Paul is a fish who used to go around in circles. He made big circles and little circles. He circled from left to right and from right to left. He circled from top to bottom and from bottom to top. What else was there to do? Until one day Bernadette drops in and shows Paul that there is a whole world out there, right outside his bowl, with so many things to see. A banana-shaped boat! A blue elephant with a spoutlike trunk (be quiet when she's feeding her babies)! A lovely lunetta butterfly, with tortoise-shell rims! Simple saturated paintings play off this charming ode to an active imagination — and the way that life changes when a bewitching creature opens your eyes.

Peter's Old House by Elsa Beskew:  At the end of a street, in a little village, is Peter's house. It's an old, falling down house. But Peter helps everyone: mending things, building toy boats, and telling stories. Will anyone help him when an official says his house must be pulled down? This is a wonderful, charming story in the best tradition of Elsa Beskow's Swedish tales, as all the children in the village rally round to help Peter when he needs them most.

Brimsby's Hats by Andrew Prahin:  A lonely hat maker uses quirky creativity to make friends in this delightful picture book that will charm readers young and old.

Brimsby is a happy hat maker—until his best friend goes off to find adventure at sea. Now Brimsby is a lonely hat maker, unsure of what to do. But since making hats is what he does best, perhaps his talents can help him find some friends.

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E-I-E-I-O: How Old Macdonald Got His Farm by Judy Sierra:  Once upon a time, Old MacDonald didn't have a farm. He just had a yard — a yard he didn't want to mow. But under the direction of the wise (and ecologically sensitive) Little Red Hen, Mac learns to look at the environment in a very different way, and whole new worlds start to bloom with the help of some mud, garbage, horse poop, and worms! Judy Sierra's spirited verse, paired with Matthew Myers's exuberant illustrations, yields a fresh take on a children's classic, complete with raised-bed gardens and an organic farmers' market—making this a perfect story for armchair gardeners and devoted locavores of all sizes.

Poem-Mobiles: Crazy Car Poems by J. Patrick Lewis:  The U.S. Children's Poet Laureate and an award-winning children's poet join their prolific forces in this picture book of poems about cars. But they're not just any cars: there's the "Sloppy-Floppy-Nonstop-Jalopy" ("So unique there is no copy"); the Bathtub Limosine ("With hot water heating / And porcelain seating"); and the "High Heel Car." Each of the thirteen quirky, inventive poems will speak directly to the imaginations of children, as will Holmes's high-concept, detail-filled illustrations. 

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Henny by Elizabeth Rose Stanton:  Henny doesn't look like any other chicken she knows. Instead of wings, she has arms! Sometimes Henny likes being different—she enjoys the way her arms flutter like ribbons when she runs—but other times…not so much. She just can't do things the same way as the other chickens. But doing things the same as everyone else is overrated, as Henny comes to realize in this warmhearted story, sweetly told and illustrated with fresh, expressive artwork that celebrates the individual in everyone.

 

Kamishibai Man by Allen Say:  The Kamishibai man used to ride his bicycle into town where he would tell stories to the children and sell them candy, but gradually, fewer and fewer children came running at the sound of his clappers. They were all watching their new televisions instead. Finally, only one boy remained, and he had no money for candy. Years later, the Kamishibai man and his wife made another batch of candy, and he pedaled into town to tell one more story—his own. When he comes out of the reverie of his memories, he looks around to see he is surrounded by familiar faces—the children he used to entertain have returned, all grown up and more eager than ever to listen to his delightful tales.